One Direction Impress Fans Of All Ages At Sydney Concert

Flirty in floral: Katy Perry looked cute in a patterned minidress as she supported John Mayer at his Hollywood Bowl concert on Saturday night

The 28-year-old singer looked pretty as a picture in a figure-hugging floral dress with Peter Pan-style collar as she headed in to watch the musical event. Katy finished off her ensemble with black tights and heeled black boots, highlighting her slim waist with a thin black belt around her middle. Flirty in floral: Katy Perry looked cute in a patterned minidress as she supported John Mayer at his Hollywood Bowl concert on Saturday night Feminine style: Katy looked cute in the outfit, but toughened up her look with black tights and heeled boots Adding to her feminine look, Katy left her raven hair in loose curls, completing the look with a cute barette. According to reports, Katy was joined at the concert by her parents Keith and Mary Hudson, who were no doubt thrilled to be able to enjoy their daughter’s love’s talent – following her former marriage to controversial comedian Russell Brand. Katy’s night out comes as she gears up for the release of her new album PRISM on October 18th. But in a recent interview, Katy revealed she thinks a natural progression for her will be leave behind the cheeky pop and dance tunes she’s famous for. Instead, the musician – who did release one self-titled LP under her real name Katy Hudson before becoming Katy Perry – plans to make an acoustic record in the style of Big Yellow Taxi songwriter Joni Mitchell. Keeping things simple: Katy opted for a bronze smoky eye and wore her raven hair in loose curls Belting it out: John Mayer seen here performing earlier in the week Speaking to Billboard, Katy said: ‘I’ll probably turn into more of a Joni Mitchell. As I inch towards my 30s, I think my fourth record will be more of an acoustic guitar album.’ Although PRISM will be similar in style to her previous releases, Katy insists all the tracks are about her life, with By The Grace of God chronicling the suicidal thoughts she had after her marriage to Russell ended in December 2011. She said: ‘I can only write autobiographically. I put all the evidence in the music. I tell my fans if they want to know the real truth about stuff, just listen to the songs.’ PRISM is to be released on October 18.

For the young and young at heart: Alan Stokes (centre) with his teenage daughter Claire at the One Direction Concert in Sydney.

A strike by stagehands forced the cancellation, but the union temporarily suspended its strike on Thursday, allowing the concert hall to open its doors for now. A union leader told Reuters he was optimistic the two sides could reach a permanent deal by Friday. The dispute hangs on whether the stagehands – mostly prop-makers, carpenters and electricians – should have a role in a new educational wing that the Carnegie Hall Corp plans to open above the hall next year. The corporation wants to hire cheaper labor at the education wing. Negotiations with the union took an unprecedented turn on Wednesday when Local 1 of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees decided to go on strike for the first time in the history of Carnegie Hall. However, when James Claffey, president of Local 1, emerged from negotiations on Thursday afternoon, he announced the union had agreed to pull down the picket line for the day, citing progress in the talks. “This is a goodwill gesture towards Carnegie Hall,” said Claffey, whose local has negotiated some of the most lucrative pay in the industry. He later said further progress had been made, and that even though picketing would continue, he hoped to reach a deal by Friday. Carnegie Hall’s five full-time stagehands make an average of $400,000 per year including benefits, The New York Times reported, citing the organization’s tax returns. Claffey said there were many more stagehands represented by the union who work only sporadically. “This dispute is not about those employees,” Claffey said. “This is about everyone else. These are middle class employees.” The strike forced Carnegie Hall to cancel a performance by the Philadelphia Orchestra with violinist Joshua Bell.

Carnegie Hall concert goes on, after strike canceled performance

In the future, the star or his promoter may be required to carry separate insurance on his entourage. “The biggest stars all have doctors and their own staff,” said Lorrie McNaught, senior vice president at Aon/Albert G. Ruben Insurance Services Inc, a large entertainment insurance firm, which has handled many of the world’s biggest tours over the last 12 months. “If you have a security guard who winds up punching someone in the face or kills someone, who is responsible? “Is it the artist, the bodyguard, the promoter? I think promoters will require stars to indemnify their own staff,” said McNaught. “Even if AEG was not held responsible, I still think this case will make attorneys find ways to tighten contracts.” An attorney for Lloyds of London involved in the Michael Jackson case declined comment for this story. The price of premiums also may go up, according to one concert producer who did not want his name used. Currently, promoters pay 3 percent to 5 percent of the value of the policy, meaning that AEG paid between $530,000 and $875,000 for the $17.5 million policy it took out with Lloyds of London for Jackson’s “This is It” tour. AEG, which had initially sought to collect on the $17.5 million policy after Jackson’s death canceled the tour, dropped a claim against Lloyds amid revelations in leaked emails that show AEG executives were concerned about his stability ahead of his planned London comeback tour. Insurers routinely send doctors to do medical exams — and occasionally hire investigators for background checks– before placing multi-million dollar policies for the stars. After the Jackson trial, the reams of information they need will skyrocket, said Adam Steck, CEO of SPI Entertainment, who recently brokered a deal for an 18-show run by rocker Meatloaf at Planet Hollywood in Vegas, starting September 26.

Analysis: Jackson case will change the tune for concert, artist insurance

Today October 6 by BWW News Desk Tweet The Frick Collection presents its seventy-fifth anniversary season of classical music concerts in the elegant setting of the museum’s Music Room. Debuting in 1938, just three years after The Frick Collection opened to the public; the concert series is one of the most celebrated in New York City and has delighted thousands of visitors over the years with world-class performances ranging from solo recitals to chamber music groups to early music ensembles. The Music Room, built in 1935 as part of the transformation of the private mansion into a museum and the setting for concerts since then, conveys the atmosphere of a private salon, offering performers and attendees a uniquely intimate environment and impressive acoustics. During its distinguished history, the concert program has been recognized for the special niche it fills in the highly competitive and rich world of music performance in New York. The Frick has been host to major soloists and ensembles such as legendary instrumentalists Gregor Piatigorsky, Artur Schnabel, Josef Szigeti, and Wanda Landowska; vocalists Kiri Te Kanawa , Peter Pears, Kathleen Battle , and Elisabeth Soderstrom; and the Budapest, Amadeus, Tokyo, and Guarneri quartets. In recent years, it has become prestigious for European musicians to make their New York debuts at the Frick, notable examples being Ian Bostridge, Matthias Goerne, Felicity Lott, Pieter Wispelway, Julian Rachlin, Kate Royal, Yevgeny Sudbin, the Jacques Thibaud Trio, the Carmina Quartet, and Fretwork. The Frick has also become an important venue for performances on period instruments such as Jordi Savall with Hesperion XX, Richard Egarr (harpsichord), Andrew Manze (violin), and the Quatuor Mosaiques. Highlights of the 2013-14 season include return performances in honor of the seventy-fifth anniversary: violinist Augustin Hadelich; cellist David Geringas; the early music ensemble Trio Settecento; and baritone Wolfgang Holzmair. Debuts this year include Russian pianist Anna Vinnitskaya (winner of the 2007 Queen Elizabeth Competition); renowned Swiss recorder player Maurice Steger; the award-winning Meccorre Quartett from Poland; acclaimed Swiss pianist Olivier Cave; and the internationally recognized Minguet Quartett from Austria. The Frick concert series also has a long history of reaching audiences far beyond those present for performances. Since 1939 the concerts have been broadcast on the Municipal Broadcasting System, American Public Radio, and WNYC Radio. Currently, concerts can be heard on WQXR/National Public Radio.

Concert Series at The Frick Collection to Celebrate 75th Anniversary

When the boys dropped their often inaudible chatter which slowed the momentum, and when they stopped trying to be rock gods, one thing was clear: they doupbeat pop very welland they do love just beautifully. And when they do Ed Sheeran, they do him better than he does. MomentandLittle Thingsstood out but even they couldnt compete withMore Than This. At every turn Liam Payne was on song, showing he has grown into the sort of frontman who will last way beyond a boy band. This was a coming of age show. One Direction have musical talent, can harmonise well and there was even emotion. There were no weak links, either. Zayn Malik was brilliant at times but struggled in the first half of a performance that wilted when the music stopped and the talk took over. It’s as though the boys feel they have to talk to their Directioners, but the sound was muffled and the banter too quick for anyone but those who got all the in jokes. That’s a minor criticism. There was something for all the parents who’d brought the kids along – great covers ofTeenage Dirtbagby Wheatus andTeenage Kicksby the Undertones, as well as stolen riffs fromBaba O’Rileyby The Who (Best Song Ever),Summer Lovingfrom Grease (What Makes You Beautiful) and Should I Stay or Should I Go(Live While We’re Young). Most of all, though, it was a night for the young at heart.