For Food On The Go, Bars Are Eating Up The Competition

Dieter, beware: Weight-loss fads can be bad for your health

Vegan, chocolate, gluten-free, low-glycemic, raw, sugar-free, nutty, crunchy, gooey, for kids, for weightlifters, familiar old granola bars. Packed with protein, fiber, super-fruits even some with sugar and fat. Bars for pregnant women, and the YaffBar that’s for you and your mutt to share. Larabar’s Alt gets its protein from peas; another company harvests crickets for protein. Also PHOTOS: A comparison of what’s really inside the wrapping About a fifth of Americans will eat a bar today, says Harry Balzer, chief food industry analyst for the NPD Group. (The only bigger change in our eating habits over the last decade? The explosion of yogurts.) The market research firm Packaged Facts said in an April 2012 report that the bar business approached $5.7 billion in 2011 and is still growing. “They’re their own food group,” says Terry Walters, a cookbook author and natural foods advocate. What’s more, bars are wrapped in the cachet of something that’s good for you and many of them are fine nutritionally, even though most bars have opaque packaging so it can be hard to judge. And energy bars sound pretty healthful, right? But the truth is that that just means they have calories. So before you load up for the weekend, read the label. Easy doesn’t necessarily mean healthful. In many cases, Walters says, bars are fast food and not so different from the drive-through.

New Age Fusion Food: The latest trend to hit Mumbai

It’s the latest gastronomic wave that’s sweeping the country, where chefs, delighted to cater to an increasingly maturing Indian palate, are giving fusion food a new meaning altogether – creating new-age dishes influenced by more than one cuisine. 2013-10-06 10:07:27 http://images.mid-day.com/2013/oct/17K137034A.jpg New Age Fusion Food: The latest trend to hit Mumbai Surprised at being served an Italian pizza topped with South East Asian flavours, Poha in the form of the Catalan Paella or a Galouti kebab infused with French foie gras? Don’t be. It’s the latest gastronomic wave that’s sweeping the country, where chefs, delighted to cater to an increasingly maturing Indian palate, are giving fusion food a new meaning altogether – creating new-age dishes influenced by more than one cuisine. http://www.mid-day.com/lifestyle/2013/oct/061013-fusion-food-new-trend-indian-chefs-and-restaurants-mumbai.htm http://images.mid-day.com/2013/oct/17K137034A.jpg Surprised at being served an Italian pizza topped with South East Asian flavours, Poha in the form of the Catalan Paella or a Galouti kebab infused with French foie gras? Don’t be. It’s the latest gastronomic wave that’s sweeping the country, where chefs, delighted to cater to an increasingly maturing Indian palate, are giving fusion food a new meaning altogether – creating new-age dishes influenced by more than one cuisine. Phorum Dalal speaks to culinary experts to get a whiff of this lip-smacking food trend As Vandana Verma enters Indian Accent, a restaurant in New Delhis Hotel Manor, pungent aromas of red, yellow and green spices greet her. The menu, too, is full of her favourite shorbas, kebabs, bread baskets and biryanis. But when the kulcha is served as a mini version of the traditional size, topped with treacle bacon, and a bite of the galouti kebab frees the burst of French Foie de Gras at the centre, the food critic raises her eyebrows in happy surprise. Finally free of customers demanding every cuisine be Indianised to suit their taste buds, chefs and restaurateurs across India are letting loose their creative side. The result: a brand new culture of fusion cuisine that is delightfully international in nature. Take the example of Zorawar Kalras upcoming restaurant at Mumbais Bandra Kurla Complex (BKC), Masala Library, which opened yesterday. It hopes to change the way we perceive, eat and relish Indian food. Indian food has come to a dead end, and there is nowhere else to go with the traditional recipes.