Celebrity To Host ‘american Idol’ Finalists At Sea

‘Funniest Celebrity in Washington’: VIPs still rally to fundraiser despite little aid to charity

According to the Mayo Clinic, researchers found that consuming a Mediterranean diet heavy in olive oil can help lower some heart risks. The first press is the cold press, meaning its without heat or chemicals, and its extra virgin meaning, it is the premium olive oil that you want to buy. Anything else is a pure olive oil or its a leftover olive oil.” – Cat Cora, celebrity chef Americans also like the taste, as olive oil consumption in the U.S. has tripled over two decades. Yet, despite these facts, there remains a lot of confusion about what Greek poet Homer called “liquid gold.” Its not surprising considering its many labels: cold pressed, extra-light, pure. What do they mean and which is better? “Iron Chef” and Food Network starCat Cora stopped by FoxNews.com Live studios to help break it all down. Cora, who is of Greek-American heritage, knows a thing or two about olive oil. Shes partnered with the Mediterranean cuisine company Gaea, to develop Cat Coras Kitchen by Gaea — a range of olive oils, tapenades, cooking sauces and vinegars. Here are six truths about olive oil that will hopefully add clarity to your next bottle you purchase. TRUE OR FALSE? Olive oil isn’t good for frying food False: It does have a high smoking point, meaning it can go up to 500 degrees Fahrenheit. The reason why a lot of people do not fry, deep fry, with olive oil is because its expensive. TRUE OR FALSE? Oil that isn’t first cold-pressed is just the leftover oil True: The first press is the cold press, meaning its without heat or chemicals, and its extra virgin meaning, it is the premium olive oil that you want to buy.

A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Join the Nation’s Conversation To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Celebrity to host ‘American Idol’ finalists at sea Fran Golden, Special for USA TODAY 12:34 p.m. EDT October 3, 2013 “American Idol” runner-up Blake Lewis will appear on a Celebrity cruise. (Photo: Handout) SHARE 8 CONNECT 43 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE Celebrity Cruises is launching a series of concerts, Q&A sessions and autograph signings by finalists from past seasons of the popular Fox TV show American Idol. On the line’s Christmas cruises in the Caribbean, two American Idol singing artists will perform on each sailing. The lineup includes runner-up finalists Bo Bice (fourth season) and Blake Lewis (sixth season), as well as Elliot Yamin, who placed third in the show’s fifth season and whose self-titled album debuted at number one on the Billboard Independent Albums chart and number three on the Billboard 200. Also appearing onboard will be Kimberly Caldwell (second season), Melinda Doolittle (sixth season), Matt Giraud (eighth season) and Mikalah Gordon (fourth season). The Caribbean holiday sailings include week-long cruises on the Celebrity Reflection, Celebrity Summit and Celebrity Silhouette; a five-day cruise on the Celebrity Constellation; a 10-day cruise on Celebrity Equinox; and a 14-day sailing on the Celebrity Eclipse. The Reflection sails from Miami, the Summit from San Juan and the other ships from Fort Lauderdale. The cruise line scheduled the artists as part of its partnership with Las Vegas-based Nite Raiders entertainment, Celebrity officials said. Fran Golden is the Experience Cruise expert blogger and a contributing editor of Porthole Magazine.

Celebrity chef Cat Cora debunks common olive oil myths

(At Funniest Celebrity, patrons get sandwiches and one free cocktail; theres usually a B-list comic paid a few hundred dollars to perform.) The larger problem, White said, is the perception among ticket buyers and celebrities who lend their name and time that most of the money goes to charity. But White also faulted beneficiaries for not doing more research before signing on. Charities are taught to say thank you and nothing more. Its unfortunate. One Funniest Celebrity-branded show was a winner for charity: a 2010 Baltimore event benefiting the University of Maryland Childrens Hospital that grossed $50,000. But in that case, Siegels 501(c)3 was not involved; he was simply contracted to round up talent and the charity controlled all the money, organizer Phyllis Rabinowitz said. Michele S. Jones performs at last weeks Funniest Celebrity. (Roxanne Roberts / The Washington Post) Siegel said that recent tax records reflect a couple of bad seasons, not indicative of the 19 years. . . [but] of a few charities that really sold no tables and no tickets. He added in an e-mail that his events reap substantial free publicity and connections for the charities, which he said received some extra donations from the event directly from patrons and thus were not reflected in tax records. But, I offer that show to a charity to use in their fundraising, he wrote. I am not the fundraiser for the charity. Karen Friedman, executive vice president of this years beneficiary, the Pension Rights Center, said that Ralph Nader a first-time contestant recommended her organization. Members of her staff raised $12,500 (donors wrote checks to Funniest Celebrity), and she hopes to get $10,000 to $12,000. As for the celebrities involved with the show?