Can The Santa Monica Pier Become A Great Concert Venue?

Flirty in floral: Katy Perry looked cute in a patterned minidress as she supported John Mayer at his Hollywood Bowl concert on Saturday night

The 28-year-old singer looked pretty as a picture in a figure-hugging floral dress with Peter Pan-style collar as she headed in to watch the musical event. Katy finished off her ensemble with black tights and heeled black boots, highlighting her slim waist with a thin black belt around her middle. Flirty in floral: Katy Perry looked cute in a patterned minidress as she supported John Mayer at his Hollywood Bowl concert on Saturday night Feminine style: Katy looked cute in the outfit, but toughened up her look with black tights and heeled boots Adding to her feminine look, Katy left her raven hair in loose curls, completing the look with a cute barette. According to reports, Katy was joined at the concert by her parents Keith and Mary Hudson, who were no doubt thrilled to be able to enjoy their daughter’s love’s talent – following her former marriage to controversial comedian Russell Brand. Katy’s night out comes as she gears up for the release of her new album PRISM on October 18th. But in a recent interview, Katy revealed she thinks a natural progression for her will be leave behind the cheeky pop and dance tunes she’s famous for. Instead, the musician – who did release one self-titled LP under her real name Katy Hudson before becoming Katy Perry – plans to make an acoustic record in the style of Big Yellow Taxi songwriter Joni Mitchell. Keeping things simple: Katy opted for a bronze smoky eye and wore her raven hair in loose curls Belting it out: John Mayer seen here performing earlier in the week Speaking to Billboard, Katy said: ‘I’ll probably turn into more of a Joni Mitchell. As I inch towards my 30s, I think my fourth record will be more of an acoustic guitar album.’ Although PRISM will be similar in style to her previous releases, Katy insists all the tracks are about her life, with By The Grace of God chronicling the suicidal thoughts she had after her marriage to Russell ended in December 2011. She said: ‘I can only write autobiographically. I put all the evidence in the music. I tell my fans if they want to know the real truth about stuff, just listen to the songs.’ PRISM is to be released on October 18.

Concert photos by the L.A. Times

Comments 3 Los Angeles concert promoters Mitchell Frank, left, and Martin Fleischmann are bringing concerts and festivals to the Santa Monica Pier. (Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times / September 26, 2013) Also By Mikael Wood October 5, 2013, 7:00 a.m. A stiff breeze blew across the Santa Monica Pier on a recent afternoon, kicking up sand and sea spray as visitors munched fried food and watched a man paint names on a grain of rice. But sheltered inside a seafood joint, Mitchell Frank and Martin Fleischmann didn’t seem concerned with the weather perhaps because they were busy describing winds of change. “What we’re trying to do is create a destination for locals on the pier,” said Fleischmann, a veteran Los Angeles concert promoter. “Tourists are here all day long, but otherwise it’s underutilized.” Added Frank, another promoter hired by the nonprofit group that oversees the pier, “The mandate was to bring content here.” PHOTOS: Concerts by The Times Content in the form of musical performances isn’t unheard of on the pier, which last month wrapped its 29th annual Twilight Concert series with a free show by the reggae star Jimmy Cliff. The gig drew 30,000 people, according to some estimates. But this year the promoters expanded the menu with a slate of ticketed festivals, including All Bands on Deck! (with indie acts such as Poolside and Yacht) and September’s Beach Ball (featuring Aloe Blacc and Sly & Robbie). This weekend the pier is to host Way Over Yonder, an inaugural two-day roots-music event connected to the venerable Newport Folk Festival with performances Saturday and Sunday by Neko Case, Conor Oberst and Calexico. And Oct. 19 will bring the comedy-based Festival Supreme, assembled by Jack Black and his mock-rock band Tenacious D. The shows are part of what pier official Jay Farrand called “a larger effort to get people to take a second look at the pier to think of it not just as somewhere you take Grandma from Kansas.” But for Frank and Fleischmann whose respective companies, Spaceland and Rum & Humble, put on concerts at the Echo and the Hollywood Bowl, among other spots the activity also reflects their desire to establish a new home for music on the Westside, where a dearth of large and mid-sized venues intensified with the closing this summer of the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium.

Carnegie Hall concert goes on, after strike canceled performance

The dispute hangs on whether the stagehands – mostly prop-makers, carpenters and electricians – should have a role in a new educational wing that the Carnegie Hall Corp plans to open above the hall next year. The corporation wants to hire cheaper labor at the education wing. Negotiations with the union took an unprecedented turn on Wednesday when Local 1 of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees decided to go on strike for the first time in the history of Carnegie Hall. However, when James Claffey, president of Local 1, emerged from negotiations on Thursday afternoon, he announced the union had agreed to pull down the picket line for the day, citing progress in the talks. “This is a goodwill gesture towards Carnegie Hall,” said Claffey, whose local has negotiated some of the most lucrative pay in the industry. He later said further progress had been made, and that even though picketing would continue, he hoped to reach a deal by Friday. Carnegie Hall’s five full-time stagehands make an average of $400,000 per year including benefits, The New York Times reported, citing the organization’s tax returns. Claffey said there were many more stagehands represented by the union who work only sporadically. “This dispute is not about those employees,” Claffey said. “This is about everyone else. These are middle class employees.” The strike forced Carnegie Hall to cancel a performance by the Philadelphia Orchestra with violinist Joshua Bell. The concert was part of Carnegie Hall’s opening-night gala, the organization’s biggest fundraising event of the year.