Ahmet Ertegun, The Man Who Made Bieber, And Other Crazy Stories From The Music Business

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Mayer had had in theirs. By 1971, Ahmet Ertegun (jaunty, well dressed, bald, forty-seven years old, and of very recent Turkish extraction) was the Greatest Rock-and-Roll Mogul in the World, and the men in the businesspromoters, producers, corporate functionaries, managers, P.R. peoplewho were often cynical about the eminence of performers, were fascinated and sometimes moved by the eminence they saw in him. Ben Paynter Businessweek November 2012 How a loathsome band makes gobs of money. In addition to masterminding Nickelbacks ascent, Kroeger, 37, has found ways for his band to make money onstage and off, through licensing, merchandising, and product-placement agreements. Hes also helped groom many other acts, including some that the haters might even like. He co-owns the record company that released Carly Rae Jepsens ubiquitous summer smash, Call Me Maybe. He co-writes songs for other major artists and helps to promote them. As of May 2011, the rock-star-cum-business-mogul was earning $9.7 million a year from his various ventures, according to court records filed with the Supreme Court of British Columbia. He has a vacation home with friends in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, a 20-acre farm with stables in British Columbia, and his own home recording studio. Chad Kroeger is not just a drunken rock god: Hes a kingmaker. TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 2010, AT 6:19 PM Tornado Kills at Least Five in Oklahoma FRIDAY, APRIL 29, 2011, AT 3:07 PM Obama Gets Firsthand Look at a Tornado Damage TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 2010, AT 6:19 PM Tornado Kills at Least Five in Oklahoma. Very long title. Long long long. Tornado Kills at Least Five in Oklahoma.

Twin Forks, folk music, and the new mainstream (Video)

The two started out in roots of country and folk from the south of the nation, but in an effort to keep up with current trends, opted to make their music appeal to more of the universal pop-genre. This spawned about a decade of growing on country music well outside of the genres projected demographic. And what happens when artists struggling to break out into the industry catch a whiff of what might be the next best thing? Well, we can take a lesson from the emo craze that dominated the early millenium until about 2006 when most of the bands started transcending genres to conform to pop-punk and sell their sound (Exhibit A: Van Atta High). Folk music has been given its official nod into the mainstream media recently with the debut release of Twin Forks , the debut EP by the band of the same name. Chris Carrabba teamed up with long time friends to make this project happen, and went so far to claim that folk roots were his original plan, but he didnt want to do injustice to the genre. But then, why now? The short answer? Its finally popular. While the EP is incredible in its own right, it just seems a little too convenient that the long-time pop-acoustic singer of Dashboard Confessional suddenly strikes an affinity for folk music the minute that the genre is seeing more and more developing bands. Now, Twin Forks is a pretty decent band. They, like many folk bands put on an elaborate stage show, and sing songs that are fun and lively, sure.

Fife music tuition service threat lifted

The proposal, which would see instrumental music tuition removed for all pupils except those studying SQA exams, was roundly criticised. Picture: PA

Mark Traynor, convener of the EISs Instrumental Music Teachers Network, said: Im appalled that Fife Council would even consider this proposal. If passed, this would signal the gradual demise of instrumental tuition in Fife schools. This short-term fix will have lasting consequences for many years to come, robbing the young people of Fife of opportunities embedded in the core of the Curriculum of Excellence. Fife musician Panda Su, real name Suzanne Shaw, whose single Alphabet Song was recently featured on the soundtrack to Hollywood blockbuster movie At The End of the Street, said she was shocked at the proposal. Fife has an incredible musical heritage and schools here have played a big part in encouraging that, she said. Growing up here, its something Ive always been very grateful for and proud to support. Axing music tuition in schools across Fife would have a damaging impact on the future of music in the area. Councillor Alex Rowley, leader of Fife Council, told Scotland on Sunday this weekend that the council would not go ahead with the proposal, which is part of a wide range of cuts the authority is currently considering. We have met with education officials in the last few days looking at everything they have suggested in terms of cuts. My view is that if you were to take this option, you would in effect be wiping music education out. This proposal will remain exactly that. It will not figure in our budget going forward. It will not happen. Scottish Conservative candidate for the upcoming Dunfermline by-election James Reekie, a piper in several Fife pipe bands, said: This proposal makes no sense whatsoever. It will come at huge detriment to local children, all of whom deserve the opportunity to learn a musical instrument. Fife would live to regret this decision deeply. In June, Scotland on Sundays Let The Children Play campaign notched up a major victory with the ending of tuition fees for thousands of schoolchildren sitting Scottish Qualification Authority music exams. Five local authorities in Scotland had been charging S4 to S6 students sitting SQA music exams instrumental tuition fees of up to 340 a year, even though the exams are part of the national curriculum and playing an instrument counts for up to 60 per cent of the final mark.